Foundations and Trends® in Entrepreneurship > Vol 14 > Issue 2

Impact: Stanford University’s Economic Impact via Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Charles E. Eesley, Stanford University, USA, cee@stanford.edu William F. Miller, Stanford University, USA,
 
Suggested Citation
Charles E. Eesley and William F. Miller (2018), "Impact: Stanford University’s Economic Impact via Innovation and Entrepreneurship", Foundations and Trends® in Entrepreneurship: Vol. 14: No. 2, pp 130-278. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/0300000074

Published: 26 Apr 2018
© 2018 C. E. Eesley and W. F. Miller
 
Subjects
Business formation,  High technology: Technology-based new firms,  Nascent and start-up entrepreneurs,  High-tech clusters
 
Keywords
L26 Entrepreneurship
academic entrepreneurshiptechnology transferentrepreneurial ecosystem
 

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In this article:
1. Executive Summary
2. Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
3. Analyzing Stanford’s Entrepreneurial Footprint
4. Funding Startup Businesses
5. How Stanford’s Academic Experience Creates Entrepreneurs
6. Changing Patterns in Entrepreneurial Career Paths
7. Social Innovation, Non-Profits, and Social Entrepreneurs
8. The Lean Startup
9. How Stanford Supports Entrepreneurship—Programs, Centers, Projects
10. Stanford Faculty and Research Staff
11. Stanford Internal Entrepreneurial Ecosystem: The Office of Technology Licensing
12. Conclusions: Enhancing the Role of Research/Technology Universities in Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Acknowledgments
Appendix: Sources of Information
References

Abstract

This report focuses on data gathered from a large-scale, systematic survey of Stanford alumni, faculty and selected staff in 2011 to assess the university’s economic impact based on its involvement in entrepreneurship. The report describes Stanford’s role in fostering entrepreneurship, discusses how the Stanford environment encourages creativity and entrepreneurship and details best practices for creating an entrepreneurial ecosystem. The report on the 2011 survey, estimates that 39,900 active companies can trace their roots to Stanford. If these companies collectively formed an independent nation, its estimated economy would be the world’s 10th largest. Extrapolating from survey results, those companies have created an estimated 5.4 million jobs and generate annual world revenues of $2.7 trillion.

DOI:10.1561/0300000074
ISBN: 978-1-68083-422-2
160 pp. $70.00
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ISBN: 978-1-68083-423-9
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Table of contents:
1. Executive Summary
2. Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
3. Analyzing Stanford’s Entrepreneurial Footprint
4. Funding Startup Businesses
5. How Stanford’s Academic Experience Creates Entrepreneurs
6. Changing Patterns in Entrepreneurial Career Paths
7. Social Innovation, Non-Profits, and Social Entrepreneurs
8. The Lean Startup
9. How Stanford Supports Entrepreneurship—Programs, Centers, Projects
10. Stanford Faculty and Research Staff
11. Stanford Internal Entrepreneurial Ecosystem: The Office of Technology Licensing
12. Conclusions: Enhancing the Role of Research/Technology Universities in Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Acknowledgments
Appendix: Sources of Information
References

Impact: Stanford University’s Economic Impact via Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Stanford University has a deep history in entrepreneurship and technological innovation. For more than a century, the university has incubated ideas, educated entrepreneurs and fostered breakthrough technologies that have been instrumental in the rise and constant regeneration of Silicon Valley, and, at the same time, contributed to the broader global economy.

Impact: Stanford University’s Economic Impact via Innovation and Entrepreneurship focuses on data gathered from a large-scale, systematic survey of Stanford alumni, faculty, and selected staff in 2011 to assess the university’s economic impact based on its involvement in entrepreneurship. The report describes Stanford’s role in fostering entrepreneurship, discusses how the Stanford environment encourages creativity and entrepreneurship, and details best practices for creating an entrepreneurial ecosystem. The report on the 2011 survey, estimates that 39,900 active companies can trace their roots to Stanford. If these companies collectively formed an independent nation, its estimated economy would be the world’s 10th largest. Extrapolating from survey results, those companies have created an estimated 5.4 million jobs and generate annual world revenues of $2.7 trillion.

 
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