Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 35 > Issue 2-3

Conservation of Genetic Resources of Crops: Farmer Preferences for Banana Diversity in Sri Lanka

Wasantha Athukorala, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, Muditha Karunarathna, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, Clevo Wilson, Queensland University of Technology, Australia, clevo.wilson@qut.edu.au Shunsuke Managi, Kyushu University, Japan,
 
Suggested Citation
Wasantha Athukorala, Muditha Karunarathna, Clevo Wilson and Shunsuke Managi (2020), "Conservation of Genetic Resources of Crops: Farmer Preferences for Banana Diversity in Sri Lanka", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 35: No. 2-3, pp 177-206. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/112.00000513

Publication Date: 30 Mar 2020
© 2020 W. Athukorala, M. Karunarathna, C. Wilson and S. Managi
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
Diversityfarmer preferencesbananaconservationSri Lanka
 

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In this article:
1. Introduction
2. Theoretical Background
3. Empirical Approach
4. Main Empirical Results and Discussion
5. Policy Implications
6. Conclusions
References

Abstract

This study investigates farmer preferences for banana diversity in Sri Lanka. First, we investigate farmers’ attitudes towards banana cultivation. Secondly, we estimate diversity selection models to identify the important factors that contribute to conservation of banana diversity. The study analyses 450 banana growers in three districts representing different climatic zones. The Poisson model and Shannon Diversity Index are employed to determine the key household, market and other characteristics that are important for the conservation of banana diversity. The study indicates that maintaining on-farm diversity is receiving increased attention from farmers as a strategy for mitigating production risk and protecting food security in rural areas. Family size, education, experience, method of marketing and attitude of farmers are found to be the major determinants of banana diversity maintenance on farms. The study recommends a subsidy to farmers to cultivate traditional varieties for the purpose of maintaining farm diversity given farmers typically prefer new varieties which deliver high productivity.

DOI:10.1561/112.00000513

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Journal of Forest Economics, Volume 35, Issue 2-3 Special issue - Natural capital and ecosystem service: Sustainable forest management and climate change: Articles Overiew
See the other articles that are part of this special issue.